Wade Groetsch: Noble Juice ~ Food Interviews

Monday, October 20, 2008

Wade Groetsch: Noble Juice

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Welcome to the very first Food Interviews podcast. I would LOVE your feedback on this format. Please take a moment to fill out the short four question survey at the bottom of the post or leave your thoughts in the comments.

In this interview, Wade Groetsch shares the "juicy" details of running Noble Juice. OK, it's not all that juicy, but he answered a few questions that I have always wondered about - like what makes one 100% orange juice different from another, and what happens to the pulp that isn't used in pulp-free juice.

The best part about Noble Juice (aside from how tasty their juices are) is that their bottles and label are 100% compostable. They are the first juice company to be able to say that. In the interview, you'll hear all about how Wade is a huge recycling advocate.


8 comments:

Nancy said...

I'm currently listening to this 37 minute interview, hoping I can resume where I left off. Interesting format, but I'm not sure I have the patience to listen for this long; I read much faster.

kristen said...

The problem I have with (only) having podcasts is multi-folder (same goes for video comments and even videos):

1) I can't watch them at work without disturbing people and/or people seeing/hearing that I'm watching them (& no one here wears earphones, that would be too odd)
2) I can't skim/ see if worth listening to easily
3) I read much faster than it would take them to speak

I know that trascriptions are a major PITA but I prefer written content most of the time for those reasons.... :)

Anonymous said...

(*I haven't listened to the interview, but...*)

A true recycling advocate wouldn't put their products in "compostable" containers. First of all, bio-plastics that are marketed as compostable need to be composted in commercial composting facilities that the vast majority of the population does not have access to. Home composting doesn't reach a high enough temperature for them to break down. Even if they are composted in a commercial facility, they've found that many of them don't break down anyway. ALSO, there is a hierarchy: 1. Reduce 2. Reuse 3. Recycle 4. Compost 5. Burn for energy capture 6. Landfill...Recycling is higher on the list than composting.

Stef said...

Nancy and Kristen - Thanks so much for your feedback that is very helpful!

Anon - Wade talks a little bit about that subject in the interview. I'd be curious to hear your comments after you listen.

natalia said...

Congrats !!! for the new blog..
Natalia Penchaszadeh
zinur.com

Ivy said...

Oh, these look really good. I'll have to look for them.
I am thirsty. :)

Anonymous said...

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